Sheila Birling An Inspector Calls Essays

 
  1. I am struggling to answer this question as i feel like there is not much to say about Sheila.
    She was immature and the start of the play but then later showed maturity.
    She was remorseful for what she did to Eva, Unlike her parents.
    Priestly is conveying that the youth can change and accept responsibility whereas the older generation cannot.
    Capitalists such as Mr and Mrs Birling will not change, but the youth can leave this acient capitalist views.
    How can i structure this?
    Is this even enough information?
    I am really confused, HELPPPP
    Does anyone think Sheila will even be on the exam?

  2. Sheila is the character who goes through the largest change, from an immature acting child, to the moral superior to her parents. Analyse on how she changes, she is described as childish at first but also shows she knows the real world better than her own mother suggesting she is much more mature than first presented.

    Last edited by ghost88; 17-05-2015 at 22:49.
  3. I don't think Sheila will be on the exam anyway there are two questions . Which exam board are you doing, OCR or AQA? Write about Priestley's intentions, he uses Sheila to present his socialist view of equality but it is ignored, just like how Eva was ignored by Mrs Birling. Just keep linking stuff and you'll be fine.
    (Original post by jamillatijani)
    I am struggling to answer this question as i feel like there is not much to say about Sheila.
    She was immature and the start of the play but then later showed maturity.
    She was remorseful for what she did to Eva, Unlike her parents.
    Priestly is conveying that the youth can change and accept responsibility whereas the older generation cannot.
    Capitalists such as Mr and Mrs Birling will not change, but the youth can leave this acient capitalist views.
    How can i structure this?
    Is this even enough information?
    I am really confused, HELPPPP
    Does anyone think Sheila will even be on the exam?

The characters we see as the curtain rises are not the same as those at the plays conclusion. Inspector Goole is instrumental in disturbing the harmony; a purposeful, mysterious character who forces the characters to confront each other's social responsibility, snobbery and guilt.

But who is Inspector Goole? And who is the girl whose suicide he is apparently investigating?

Mr Arthur Birling

  • He is described at the start as a
  • He has worked his way up in the world and is proud of his achievements. He boasts about having been Mayor and tries (and fails) to impress the Inspector with his local standing and his influential friends.
  • However, he is aware of people who are his social superiors, which is why he shows off about the port to Gerald, He is proud that he is likely to be knighted, as that would move him even higher in social circles.
  • He claims the party This is not only because Sheila will be happy, but because a merger with Crofts Limited will be good for his business.
  • He is optimistic for the future and confident that there will not be a war. As the audience knows there will be a war, we begin to doubt Mr Birling's judgement. (If he is wrong about the war, what else will he be wrong about?)
  • He is extremely selfish:
    • He wants to protect himself and his family. He believes that socialist ideas that stress the importance of the community are and that
    • He wants to protect Birling and Co. He cannot see that he did anything wrong when he fired Eva Smith - he was just looking after his business interests.
    • He wants to protect his reputation. As the Inspector's investigations continue, his selfishness gets the better of him: he is worried about how the press will view the story in Act II, and accuses Sheila of disloyalty at the start of Act III. He wants to hide the fact that Eric stole money:
  • At the end of the play, he knows he has lost the chance of his knighthood, his reputation in Brumley and the chance of Birling and Co. merging with their rivals. Yet he hasn't learnt the lesson of the play: he is unable to admit his responsibility for his part in Eva's death.
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